24 February 2011

From the USG

KRATOM (Mitragyna speciosa korth)

(Street Names: Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketum, Biak)

December 2010


Kratom, (Mitragyna speciosa korth), is a tropical tree indigenous to Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar and other areas of South East Asia. Kratom is in the same family as the coffee tree (Rubiaceae). The tree reaches heights of 50 feet with a spread of over 15 feet.

Kratom has been used by natives of Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia as an herbal drug for decades. Traditionally, kratom was mostly used as a stimulant by Thai and Malaysian laborers and farmers to overcome the burdens of hard work. They chewed the leaves to make them work harder and provide energy and relief from muscle strains. Kratom was also used in Southeast Asia and by Thai natives to substitute for opium when opium is not available. It has also been used to manage opioid withdrawal symptoms by chronic opioid users.

In 1943, the Thai government passed the Kratom Act 2486 that made planting of the tree illegal. In 1979, the Thai government enacted the Narcotics Act B.E. 2522, placing kratom along with marijuana in Category V of a five category classification of narcotics. Kratom remains a popular drug in Thailand. As of December 2006, kratom is the third most popular drug within southern Thailand, after methamphetamine and marijuana. It has been reported that young Thai militants drink a “4x100” kratom formula to make them “more bold and fearless and easy to control.” The two “4x100” kratom formulas are described as a mixture of a boiled kratom leaves and mosquito coils and cola or a mixture of boiled cough syrup, kratom leaves and cola served with ice. In this report it was also mentioned use of that the “4x100” formula was gaining popularity among Muslim youngsters in several districts of Yala (Southern Thailand) and was available in local coffee and tea shops.

Kratom is promoted as a legal psychoactive product on numerous websites in the U.S. On those websites, topics range from vendors listings, preparation of tea and recommended doses, to alleged medicinal uses, and user reports of drug experiences.


Oklahoma the USG, IMHO